Home again: Things I miss about Japan

We’ve been home one day and I already miss some things about Japan.

1. The efficiency of escalators. People in Japan stand to the left so those in a hurry can pass on the right. By the time we got to LAX, that habit was gone. I was all ready to shove some people to the side so I could plow my way to customs. Some of the older Japanese people were habitually standing to the left, and I appreciate that.

2. Small and large flush options for toilets. This just make sense. Why waste the extra water if you only need a tiny flush?

3. Effective public transportation and walkable streets. In Japan, we walk, take a bus or train to get anywhere. It didn’t take long to remember how horrible traffic can be.

4. Book stores everywhere! Why doesn’t America read? I don’t even care if it’s chick lit or graphic novels. We need more book stores.

5. Healthy portions of healthy food. The only time I felt stuffed was when we ate pizza — 4 mid-sized pizzas for 4 people is too much. Every other meal was healthy, light and small enough that I could eat it all and be happily content. Tacoyaki, granted, not super healthy, but OK if you only eat one or two and share the rest.

6. Fashion. Everyone has a style and people put on makeup before they leave the house. I could use more fashion pressure. Also, dressing seasonally. It’s October. Why am I in Rainbows and a tank top?

7. Non-tourists taking pictures. I’m not the only one!

Japan, I miss your crowded streets, flashy lights and noisy cities!

Advertisements

3 comments on “Home again: Things I miss about Japan

  1. There’s definitely escalator etiquette in the US – in big city metro stations at least. (Ask anyone in DC about this – they get PISSED when tourists don’t do it.) Except here it’s stand right, walk left. Which means that mixing Americans and Japanese flyers leads to one big mess since no one knows which side is which. :\

  2. […] Flip-flops and spaghetti strap shirts year-round. I said in a previous post that “I could use more fashion pressure.” That’s still true. But when it’s hot outside, people in CA wear something […]

Share your thoughts

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s